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Esser, Wilhelm. Logik, § 3, pp. 5–6. Cf. et seq. 2d edit. 1819.—Ed. Krug, Denklehre oder Logik, § 8, p. 17

Hamilton, William. Lectures on metaphysics and logic. 1860. Ed. Henry Longueville Mansel & John Veitch, pub. Gould and Lincoln. Vol. 3, p. 17

edited by Karine Chemla (2012). The History of Mathematical Proof in Ancient Traditions. Cambridge. ISBN 978-1-107-01221-9. OCLC 804038758. {{cite book}}: |last= has generic name (help)

Albert Einstein (1923). "Geometry and Experience". Sidelights on relativity. Courier Dover Publications. p. 27. Reprinted by Dover (2010), ISBN 978-0-486-24511-9.

Carnap, Rudolf (1938). "Logical Foundations of the Unity of Science". International Encyclopaedia of Unified Science. Vol. I. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Bill, Thompson (2007), "2.4 Formal Science and Applied Mathematics", The Nature of Statistical Evidence, Lecture Notes in Statistics, vol. 189 (1st ed.), Springer, p. 15

Hamilton, William. Lectures on metaphysics and logic. 1860. Ed. Henry Longueville Mansel & John Veitch, pub. Gould and Lincoln. Vol. 4, pp. 64–65. "Formal truth will, therefore, be of two kinds,—Logical and Mathematical. […] The case is the same with the other formal science, the science of Quantity, or Mathematics."

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